New program for teens! Sound Effects for Video Games

Learn how to create sound effects for video games

Ever wondered how the sound of horse hooves were created in TV or film? Or how the sound of a creaking door opened at just the right time was made? All the sounds you hear in films, TV and video games are created by foley artists, who reproduce everyday (and not so everyday!) sound effects.

This set of workshops will explore the world of a foley artist – from sound creation and recording, through to sound manipulation. Each participant will create their own library of sounds and apply them to an existing video game on the Scratch platform.

This is a 5-session program, running April 17 thru May 15 (NEW DATES), (5 Saturdays), from 10am-Noon, on Zoom.

Designed for ages 14-17.  There are 10 spaces available, to allow for maximum interaction and collaboration within the cohort.

There is no cost for this pilot program, thanks to support from The Hamber Foundation.

REGISTER HERE

The workshops have been designed to be effectively facilitated via Zoom, and to maximise accessibility, through utilising equipment that is either commonly found in homes (such as found objects for sound making, mobile phones for audio recording) and open source software.

During the course of the the workshops, participants will develop the following skills:

● Identifying sound-making objects (obvious and the non-obvious)
● Audio recording techniques using mobile phone apps
● Audio editing techniques using open source software
● Performance and presentation skills
● Critical analysis skills through evaluation of their work and their peers

Session Outlines

Each session has “online” and “offline” elements that allow for both face to face, on zoom, and practical creative tasks away from the computer.

1. Introduction, Tech Setup, and Recording Test-run

  • Microphones and recording “studio” setup
  • Recording audio on a mobile (android/ios apps)
  • Recording test run: participants record one each of (for example) an alien laugh, creaky door, car tyres on snow, and sneakers walking in a gym.

2. Foley Artist

  • Choose instruments, including found objects and electronic devices
  • Design techniques to make and control sound, including non-conventional
  • Practice and rehearse, then present to the group

3. Analyzing game audio

  • Listen and compare game sounds in Scratch
  • Participants choose a game from Scratch to recreate the sound effects
  • Make notes: sounds and instruments, storyboarding sound timeline

4. Recording Session

  • Demonstration of performance to video playback
  • Participants play the game visuals/video and record the performance
  • Audio editing with Audacity software – cut/clip, fade in/out, reverb etc

5. Performance and feedback

  • Audio editing check-in, problem solving/assistance
  • Each participant presents their work
  • Constructive and encouraging feedback

About Beau Stocker

Teaches Percussion, Drum Kit and Digital Composition

QUALIFICATIONS
HONOURS DIPLOMA IN MUSIC, BFA IN MUSIC, MA JAZZ & IMPROVISED MUSIC, TESOL

Beau’s international teaching experience fuels a wide-ranging approach to music education. His passion for music performance and research guides his abilities to inspire.

With over thirty years of music performance experience, my expertise spans a wide variety of styles. I hold a PhD in music performance from the University of York, England, which focused on the creation, editing and manipulation of sounds – skills which are essential for a foley artist. In addition, I regularly use a variety of electronic instruments and audio software in both my compositions and performances.

My career as an educator has run in tandem with my music performance. I have extensive experience of both classroom and one-to-one teaching. I have developed and facilitated sound recording and performance workshops for university students at universities in England and Canada.

Over the last year, I have successfully adapted to a new way of working, pivoting to online teaching and performing. Through this experience I have developed a whole new skill-set, evolving effective methods of teaching music theory and practice online, and maintaining safeguarding procedures.

 Special thanks to: